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Funding Secured from The Shared Island Civic Society Fund

Funding Secured from The Shared Island Civic Society Fund

Mother Tongues & ArtsEkta Secure Funding from The Shared Island Civic Society Fund

Mother Tongues and ArtsEkta proudly announce their successful bid for funding from The Shared Island Civic Society Fund. This initiative, aimed at fostering practical North-South cooperation, provides vital support to civic society and community organizations, enabling them to strengthen existing partnerships, forge new cross-border connections and champion inclusivity and diversity across the island.

Project Overview: A Journey for Change - Exchanging Intercultural Practices

This cross-border initiative endeavours to:

  • Create opportunities for artists from migrant and minority ethnic backgrounds to engage in various arts disciplines.
  • Foster North-South links through networking, co-creation, and cultural exchange.
  • Establish a framework for artistic collaboration.
  • Showcase new artwork to audiences in Dublin and Belfast.
  • Cultivate a lasting cross-border partnership to nurture future employment prospects.

 

The year-long project consists of:

  • Artist exchanges in both cities.
  • A residential Summer School spanning 2 days in Tallaght (hosted by Mother Tongues) and 2 days in Belfast (hosted by ArtsEkta). This immersive experience will culminate in the creation of a new artwork to be shared at the Mother Tongues Festival in Tallaght, Dublin (February 2025), and ArtsEkta in Belfast (August 2025).

Project Partners

Mother Tongues and ArtsEkta share similar values and work to improve the experience of migrants by creating cultural initiatives that enhance everyone’s sense of belonging in their local community. 

Founded in 2018, Mother Tongues is a pioneering not-for-profit organisation promoting multilingualism and intercultural dialogue in Ireland. Mother Tongues is the first organisation in Ireland to employ creative arts to support families to embrace their mother tongue & increase confidence in linguistic & cultural identity.

ArtsEkta, established in 2006, works at the grassroots to strengthen and deepen relationships within and between black and minority ethnic (BME) and indigenous communities through a series of exciting, inspiring and innovative cultural and heritage-based programmes

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Should we speak more than one language to our child?

Should we speak more than one language to our child?

Should we speak more than one language to our child?

If you speak more than one language at home, you might be wondering how and when to introduce them to your child. Myths are widespread, so it is important to distinguish myths from facts.

One of the most common myths is that children who hear more than one language get confused. Another is that those children start speaking later or have language problems. 

The truth is that children who speak two languages are more common than children who just speak one language, and babies are born ready to learn any language they hear in their environment. 

Should we speak more than one language to our child?

So, what’s the best way to get started? Talk to your baby in the language you are most comfortable speaking as soon as the baby is born. Make language part of your daily routine, and immerse your child in the language as much as possible, through play, chatting, and having fun. When the use of the language is spontaneous and enjoyable from the start, children will see it as a normal part of their life.

Some children might become more comfortable using the language of the majority, but don’t worry, with patience and additional doses of language immersion your child will continue to acquire the language, even if they don’t use it consistently. 

A question I get a lot is whether parents should force children to stick to one language, or pretend they don’t understand or refuse to talk back to the child unless the communication is happening in the home language. Most children will see this as a rejection, and won’t like this approach. When children are younger, you can encourage them to use your language by rephrasing what they have said or by playing games where you both have to take turns in talking or asking questions. 

When they’re older, you can explain the importance of being bilingual and why it matters to you, and why it will be an advantage in the years to come.

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il gatto frncisco

Quarantined Stories

Quarantined Stories

LOGBOOK by Simona Roveda, with Asia&Isabella

Simona Roveda is an Italian artist (performer, director and facilitator).
In Italy she collaborated with the company “Teatro d’Arte” and with the “Centro Sperimentale Danza Teatro” in Treviso. After graduating in the performing arts (DAMS Teatro) at the University of Bologna (Italy), she moved to Dublin, dedicating herself to children’s theater.
She has collaborated with the Italian Cultural Institute, creating theater shows for children and with the Draiocht Theatre in Dublin in projects for communities (Hallelujah Clown Choir, Home Theater, My Place My Story). Simona studied the art of the Clown with director Veronica Coburn and actress Ruth Lehane in Dublin. Her research into the Clown continues with the Teatro C’Art in Florence (Italy) with the director André Casaca. Simona was co-founder of “Littlebellybuttons” Puppets Company.

During the quarantine time, I decided to keep alive the theatre group of children in Italian language.

We were a very small group but very enthusiastic to see each other, so I decided to go ahead and I made 6 Zoom meetings of 30min each. The aim was to meet in the digital way and see if I could stimulate their creativity and keep the sense of the group…It was a big challenge!

We met inside the rooms of our house and we shared the things we love more: “Francisco the cat and his miraculous jump from the 3rd floor, and the giant dog Delta who walks without a finger.” They became the protagonists of our stories!

I used some theatre games for stimulating their attention…we looked at each other in the eye of our camera and heard with ears tense, we took the other’s movements and we passed them each other. To build the story we used some objects we had at home…We found some memories inside a jewellery box and it came out the granny’s red pearl necklace, a crucifix and a snake in the chicken coop who struggles to eat the eggs.

From all of these the little story of “Francisco the cat” came out…and you can read it below in Italian!

Simona Roveda

il gatto frncisco

“Il gatto Francisco”: Il gatto Francisco alla finestra guardava giu’, quando decise di saltare per prendersi una boccata d’aria. Sembrava volasse ma cadde in un cespuglio e continuo’ ad andare sempre piu’ giu’ fino a ritrovarsi da un’altra parte…era arrivato a casa di nonna Brigid! Nonna Brigid ha una scatola porta gioie dove tiene le sue collane…quella con un crocifisso d’oro e quella con le perle rosse, che é speciale…quando la usa la tiene tra le mani, si siede, chiude gli occhi e perla dopo perla la gira tutta finch’é finisce la preghiera. Francisco pero’ va nel pollaio, ma invece delle galline trova un serpente che vuole mangiarsi le loro uova! Francisco vuole salvare le uova e cosi’ si batte con il serpente…é una lotta con le unghie, la coda e la lingua…e alla fine vince Francisco che leccandosi le zampine si addormenta sopra il fienile.”

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